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MD Homegrown School Lunch Week- For Students, Farmers and Parents

16 Sep
In Maryland, this week is Homegrown School Lunch Week. Schools are partnering with local farmers this week. The food served in the lunch rooms will be made from ingredients coming from local farmers. There are several goals of this program. The most important one is to teach children about the implications their eating choices can affect their health, their family, local farmers and the environment.
This week the students will experience many changes at school. There is a wide array of activities planned this week. One of the activities on the list  was to invite parents and grandparents to school to eat lunch with their children. This activity stuck out for me.
The educators are targeting the children. They want the children to learn these valuable and life saving lessons, but it does not stop there. The children are supposed to learn about local farmers, health concerns and the environment and then teach their parents. It reminds me of the recycle programs that we had in elementary school. We got prizes based on the number of aluminum cans we brought into recycle. As a result, I went home and collected cans. My family never recycled before this, but suddenly I was talking about recycling and how important it is.
I still recycle today. I recycle a lot more than just aluminum cans. So I learned my lesson. But my parents were not in the classroom, but they still recycle today. I’m sure a lot of factors led to my parents to the decision to continue recycling, but I would say I helped changed their habits.
I hope this week proves to be successful for the students, the farmers and the community. I will post any information I find on the success or failure of this program. If you have more details please leave comments!

In Maryland, this week is Homegrown School Lunch Week. Schools are partnering with local farmers this week. The food served in the lunch rooms will be made from ingredients coming from local farmers. There are several goals of this program. The most important one is to teach children about the implications their eating choices can affect their health, their family, local farmers and the environment.

This week the students will experience many changes at school. There is a wide array of activities planned this week. One of the activities on the list was to invite parents and grandparents to school to eat lunch with their children. This activity stuck out for me.

The educators are targeting the children. They want the children to learn these valuable and life saving lessons, but it does not stop there. The children are supposed to learn about local farmers, health concerns and the environment and then teach their parents. It reminds me of the recycle programs that we had in elementary school. We got prizes based on the number of aluminum cans we brought into recycle. As a result, I went home and collected cans. My family never recycled before this, but suddenly I was talking about recycling and how important it is.

I still recycle today. I recycle a lot more than just aluminum cans. So I learned my lesson. But my parents were not in the classroom, but they still recycle today. I’m sure a lot of factors led to my parents to the decision to continue recycling, but I would say I helped changed their habits.

I hope this week proves to be successful for the students, the farmers and the community. I will post any information I find on the success or failure of this program. If you have more details please leave comments!

 
1 Comment

Posted by on September 16, 2009 in Sustainable Agriculture

 

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One response to “MD Homegrown School Lunch Week- For Students, Farmers and Parents

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